What it feels like to give an adjustment

Yesterday my Cervicals partner got to do a full work-up on me and adjust me for the first time. She was not able to adjust in Toggle because her partner was not in pattern, which is essential for upper cervical care. Being “in pattern” means that whenever you run a scan on a titron, the results come out the same on more than one day. So this was her very first adjustment, and I was more than happy to be her patient.

Since I wasn’t able to explain my first cervical adjustment to you on Monday, I asked her if she would share with me how she felt while she performed her very first adjustment. She was more than happy to share that experience with you today. Here is what she told me:

So how I felt about giving you an adjustment … all the work leading up to it made me excited and a little nervous. I was really hoping that I did everything right, and that I could accurately motion out a truly subluxated segment.

Then when it came down to which technique to use, I was like, “Oh, crap, I hate cervical chair, especially with the #6 contact point.” Then when I set up on you and you told me I had good contact, it really boosted my confidence! So then I was like, yeah, I can do this! And then when I brought you to tension and was about to thrust, I was like, “Oh, crap (again), I hope I still have good contact.” I was really scared that I was gonna sting you and just make things worse with the subluxation (so I hope you weren’t lying when you said it was fine!). But it was nice to be able to thrust twice, even though I didn’t really get the segment to move.

Afterwards, it was great to have feedback from you and Dr. Hynes. I couldn’t tell during the whole thing how well she thought I was doing, but it was very reassuring at the end when she said I was thorough and did a good job. Now I feel more like a soon-to-be doctor, and it’s fantastic! You were an awesome patient!

She couldn’t have said it any better. I felt just about the same way with my first adjustment. At first you’re really nervous because you’re not sure you’re doing it right. Then you pump yourself up and you’re like, “Yeah, I can totally do this!” Then you get ready to thrust, and you’re right back to thinking, “Oh no! I’m not sure I can this.” In the end you are always able to do it. It’s what we are trained to do and we are trained very well.

You work all trimester to lead up to this point, and it makes the whole trimester and first year leading up to these opportunities worth it. You get fired up and remember why your here. Hopefully I will have another story of adjusting on Wednesday when I will hopefully be able to give it another shot, because after all, that’s what I came here to do and what I enjoy talking about!

-Allisha

Finals are coming … and I almost got to adjust!

It’s been another busy week in fifth trimester. We’ve exactly one week of classes left before we jump into finals. I believe most of the lower trimesters are finished with most of their testing then. Our class has practicals and quizzes almost every day until finals. It probably wouldn’t be this packed had we not missed four days of classes. I had the majority of my practicals Monday and Tuesday, so the rest of the week is pretty steady.

It snowed a good chunk yesterday and last night, and it seemed like the main concensus from most of the people I talked to was they were not going to be happy if classes were cancelled again. Although there are still people that are on board with snow days. To their disappointment, we were in classes Thursday even though the surrounding schools were cancelled.

Another cervical X-ray!

Another cervical X-ray!

This Monday was supposed to be my first adjusting day in my cervicals class. I got through the full work-up in a timely manner, made sure my patient was in good condition and was even able to isolate an atlas subluxation. A full work-up includes having a detailed case history on your patient, finding out everything about them to make sure there are no contraindications. Visualization–looking at your patients posture. Leg checks–range of motion of the cervical spine and reflex testing cervical nerve roots. Then I had to perform a few orthopedic tests that were related to the cervical spine to make sure she didn’t have any significant injuries or pathologies. We did our first check for subluxations using the nervoscope then confirmed our findings with static and motion palpation.

Unfortunately, my patient’s X-rays were not marked properly so we weren’t able to adjust. She is going to get the proper markings on them this week, and we are going to give it another try the last day of classes. I will let you know how it goes.

I have only had one experience adjusting in toggle, but it’s exhilarating so I am really looking forward to hopefully getting that opportunity next Wednesday in cervicals. My partner gets her opportunity to adjust me during our next class!

As for now, there isn’t much else really happening this week. Everyone is just trying to prepare for finals!

-Allisha

Day off? No thanks!

Cervical X-rayWe had yesterday off due to Martin Luther King Jr. Day, but that doesn’t mean it was spent sitting on the couch watching TV and playing on the Internet–at least not for the most part.

My friends and I got together to practice some cervical set-ups and prepare for our practicals this week. We have offically learned all of the set-ups we will learn for cervical adjusting, and we are being tested over them this week to get ready for our clinical basic testing, in which we will do full work-ups on our classmates and hopefully get to adjust their cervical subluxations.

Sometimes there is no better help than your peers. There were six of us that got together. Two people doing the set-ups, two patients and two people asking possible questions we could get during the practical. This is my favorite way to study. You get advice from students that have been learning the same things you are and that have had the same complications with the set-ups, and they’re able to tell you what works better for them or critque you on what you can do to make your set-up better for your patients.

And, of course, getting together with a group of friends is always a good time.

-Allisha