My chiropractic miracle: One month to live

I grew up in the South Bay area of Los Angeles. I chose chiropractic as a life career because, once when I was very young and again when I was in high school, something happened to me that changed my life forever.

As an infant, I suffered with severe asthma. I was in and out of hospitals and medical offices, and was constantly on medication. I had to sleep in an inclined position, and someone had to stay up with me so that, when I couldn’t breath, they could turn on steam or rush me to the hospital.

At one point, at about the age of one, my parents were told that there was nothing more that anyone could do and that I had about one month to live. It was at this point that they decided to take me to a chiropractor. Dr. Charles Jones, a Palmer-trained chiropractor in Torrance, discovered that my top vertebra–the atlas–was jammed up against my skull from a birth trauma. This was causing interference with the delicate nerves that, among other things, control the lungs and entire respiratory system, causing them to dysfunction.

Dr. Jones gave me my first adjustment and, shortly afterwards, I began to cough up large amounts of phlegm and mucus. Within a week, and after a few more adjustments, I was breathing normally with no signs of asthma. I grew up with regular chiropractic care and enjoyed a very healthy, asthma-free life, thanks to chiropractic.

Now for the second part of the story. In high school, with no signs of any respiratory problems, I focused my life on competitive athletics. While playing football, I was injured and developed a serious condition known as a disc herniation. I had constant pain in my lower back and right leg. Over time, I couldn’t run and walking became difficult. After considering surgery (the only option, according to the surgeon), I again turned to chiropractic. It worked so well for me, and I was so impressed with the other miracles I saw in the doctor’s office, that I eventually went to chiropractic college myself. I now dedicate myself to helping others find the cause of their ailments and seek out natural, holistic solutions to health problems.

Donald J. Baune, D.C. (Davenport ’79)

I sent 40 prospective students to Palmer

Earlier this month, Dr. James Caballero sent an e-mail to Palmer, which said he was sending the names of 40 prospective students to the College. Here’s how he did it and why. –Editor

The 28th Annual Career Fair at the Oxnard Community Center in Oxnard, Calif., was held earlier this month. This was my sixth or seventh year attending the fair to promote Palmer College. But I’ve also participated in other career fairs, including one at Pepperdine University in Malibu.

I got involved in recruiting for Palmer about 10 years ago. They asked me, and I decided it would be a great way to contribute to PCC. I have always talked to students, patients and others who were interested in chiropractic. But the only one I officially sent was my son, Dr. James A. Caballero. He attended PCC San Jose (Palmer’s West Campus) and graduated in 1991. He has an active practice in San Diego.

To all alumni I would simply say that recruiting students is the best way to help Palmer and our profession. It also gives you good exposure. Most fairs are put on by school districts, and they really appreciate our attendance as presenters.

Doing a booth at a fair is really easy. All I ask the students who approach is, “Are you interested in the health field?” They usually say yes, then I follow up with, “Fill out this card, and Palmer College will send you information on becoming a Doctor of Chiropractic.” They generally fill out the card. It is surprising how many are thinking about chiropractic! Also, at this last fair, most of the sign-ups were young women.

By the way, at this fair I was approached by the city of Ventura, Calif. They asked me to be in their first Career/Job/Volunteer Expo on May 17.

If you are interested in attending recruitments for Palmer, contact the Alumni Office at alumni@palmer.edu and they’ll set you up with plenty of information and materials.

Best regards,

James Caballero, D.C. (Davenport ’74)