Part 1 Boards – The Exam Process

National Boards security is serious business ... well, not this serious, but serious enough!

National Boards security is serious business … well, not this serious, but serious enough!

So a lot of people were right–they tell you Boards aren’t that bad and that you are going to be fine and that you are a good student and you know more than you think, so you will survive. They were right.

When you arrive at the school in the morning, you need to make sure you aren’t wearing or holding or have in your pockets anything that the NBCE has on their “not allowed in” list, which includes everything except the clothes your wearing, two pieces of ID and a key (but the clothes can’t have hoods or baggy pockets, and the keys can’t have a key fob on them).

You come to the test zone and go through a security checkpoint, and then you find the room where you are supposed to be writing the exam. Once you go into the room you check in by showing your two pieces of ID, and they give you a lanyard with your picture on it, which you are expected to wear all the time. The seats are assigned, so you go find your seat at which there is a name card, a mechanical pencil and some ear-plugs.

Once everyone has checked in and found their seats, the proctors hand out the exam (which is sealed) and you are not allowed to open it until they have read through the entire instructions and allowed you to open the exam. They read through these same instructions before each exam so you get used to the process pretty quickly. Once the instructions have been read through and you have filled out your exam scorecard, you wait until the proctor says you may begin the exam.

Once the exam has begun (90 questions to be completed in 75 minutes), they will only allow you to leave the room during scheduled breaks or escorted by a proctor. If you have finished your exam by the time there is 30 minutes remaining, you may leave but if you haven’t, you must stay and wait until the 15-minute remaining mark at the next allowed break.

When you have been let out of the room, you can go do whatever it is you want to until the next exam start time. Then you have to go through the entire process again, starting with going through security.

It was a pretty crazy few days!

-Kailey

Part 1 Boards – The Exams

test timeSome were hard and some were not. There were definitely questions that I knew on all the exams, but there were also questions that I didn’t know on the exams, too. I was really surprised by spinal and general anatomy at how straightforward and easy the questions were. These exams were the ones we had on the first day. And I felt really good after finishing that day. I was thinking to myself, “If only they were all that straightforward. I can’t believe I spent so much time stressing out about a lot of little details!” But the next day was a little harder.

I thought general anatomy and spinal anatomy were going to be the hardest exams because they cover the most material and seem the most pertinent to being a chiropractor. But they were, in my opinion, by far the easiest exams, and it was physiology and microbiology that seemed to ask the most random information instead of the big concepts.

That was the most frustrating part about the exams. You would think that they would ask you questions relating to the things that are the most important to know or that will be information you will use every day. For example, plexus information or cranial nerve information or even facet orientation and receptors in the skin. But none of that stuff was heavily tested. One or two questions were asked about things that I thought were going to be a large portion of the exams.

But the end of the day on Sunday, I was definitely burnt out, and I could tell as I was writing the exam that I was being a little impulsive. They would have questions about things that I didn’t review or that I didn’t remember anything about, so I would just choose an answer I thought sounded right by breaking down the word or going with my “guess letter,” which is a letter we all decided we would pick if we didn’t know the answer.

But looking back on the day, I think it wasn’t nearly as bad as I thought it was going to be, And it was a bit of a relief to see others felt the same way that I did or that I did know some things in the exams.

I guess we’ll just have to wait and see what happens when the scores come out in a month, because there is nothing we can do now!

-Kailey

A.R.T.

active release technique

Photo from Shepard Pain and Performance Care (http://www.bnchiro.com/)

So I started practicing for my A.R.T. (Active Release Techniques) seminar coming up in December. We have a huge book with a ton of protocols and an exam that we have to learn before we go to the seminar so that we will have some kind of base knowledge and know how to work with. There are just over 100 protocols for the upper extremity, so it is a lot of material to cover!

They have sent me a very large textbook along with a DVD that is an instructional video on how to do each protocol. So my roommates have been nice enough to volunteer their arms and shoulders and necks to allow me to practice on them! Essentially I will read over a protocol out of my textbook that covers which muscles I am working on, how to contact and where to contact the muscle and then what motion to put my patient through to get the correct tension and effectiveness. Then I will watch the video that shows how to do it and then practice it on my patient a few times on either side.

So far I have made it through half of the protocols, and I am starting to catch on to the trend of how A.R.T. works and how much pressure to use and how to move my patients through a motion while I apply pressure to the muscle or its attachment, etc.

I am finding this to be a big review of gross anatomy, which is great! Only two more weeks until the seminar, and I have a lot more protocols to go through before I’m ready, but nonetheless I am really excited to be getting certified in it! A.R.T was a big reason I became interested in chiropractic in the first place, so I am excited to finally be getting to learn how to do something that had sparked my interest in this career and got me to where I am today–here at Palmer!

Cheers,
Kailey

Extra Credit

Extra credit cat

Extra credit cat

I love extra credit points! You know when your professors surprise you when you least expect it with that little extra credit quiz. It really just brings up my mood when I know I was there for the class and am going to earn a couple extra points that might make up for something I missed on a previous exam or assignment that I was kicking myself for.

Some professors ask a few questions using the clickers, or some ask you to hand in something on a notecard. The question is usually something related to what we did in class that day, so if you were paying attention at all, you are usually going to get the points!

Sometimes our lives just get so busy for whatever reason, and we just find ourselves unprepared for an upcoming quiz, exam or assignment. And when we do poorly on things like this, it’s easy to get down on ourselves and think back to all the times we could have put in a little more study time or a little more effort to focus and pay attention in class. After each time this happens, we swear we will change and do better next time, which is good. It’s good sometimes to do something wrong, if only to learn how we can improve for the future.

But that being said it still is nice to get a little boost as a thank-you for attending class and trying to better yourself for the next thing. It takes a little bit of the stress off by getting those extra credit points, after all it could be the difference between a B or and A or even a pass or a fail!

Cheers to extra credit points!

Kailey