The two-way street of communication is always open

One thing I have done at Palmer that has been out of my comfort zone is getting in touch with the faculty and administration. I’ve always been very comfortable talking with other students, even support and office staff, but in the past I have limited my interactions with my professors. In my head, they didn’t have time for me, they weren’t interested, they had no idea who I was. At this school there is an illusion that you can fade into the background in the classroom. It’s an illusion indeed, because as I began to talk with faculty I realized how aware professors are of their class, no matter how big the class size. Many professors knew my name or face without ever having a conversation with me. Once I was realized that recognition here was a good thing, I was able to ignore the previous intimidation that held me back from obtaining tips, tricks, knowledge, and advice from those who are here to do just that. The faculty and administration at Palmer are genuinely interested in the thoughts, suggestions, and questions from the student body. My experience at school has become much more enjoyable since I acknowledged that the two-way street of communication between faculty and student is wide open.

Hannah Anderson – Iowa Campus

Those who can, teach

At Palmer, we have some truly amazing faculty. Many of these teachers are chiropractors (who also have their own chiropractic practices on the side) and give of their time so freely. They live and breathe chiropractic to their core and have so much knowledge, passion and philosophy to pass on to us students.

Just in the past week, I heard the “student favorite” Dr. Burns speak in pediatrics club about SIDS and the numerous research studies showing that nearly all babies dying from SIDS had atlanto-occipical subluxations such as an “AS occiput” causing upper cervical cord pressure. I also had numerous 1-on-1 conversations with technique professors regarding clinical situations and adjusting procedures. I couldn’t ask for better faculty-student relationships than I’ve had here at Palmer.

– Lacey

Carpe classes! Take full advantage of your classes

With every new trimester comes a new adventure. It’s always wonderful completing another trimester and getting one step closer towards graduation, but what is even more exciting to me is starting a new trimester with new professors. There is such a wide array of professors, and each has their own experience and specialty. You know that if you truly put the effort in to attend classes and listen to information they are sharing, you will take away a lot of information as well as life’s lessons from that instructor.

We recently had a professor hit home on the importance of coming to class and reminded us of the fact that although the subject may or may not be our favorite, that one class you missed may have pertained to the one fact you really wanted to know about. Our professors make it known they are not here to just read to you from a textbook but to teach how to apply this information now and in your future as a chiropractor.

Classes are back … and so is the smell of freshly sharpened pencils

I have a love/hate relationship with the first day of school. I have just experienced my fourth first day of school at Palmer, and our relationship status might read “it’s complicated.” If you are currently an undergraduate or high school student, you either stretch summer as long as possible and loathe getting into routine again, or you buy school supplies in July and pack your backpack two weeks ahead of time. I am the latter, therefore if you are the latter, don’t be ashamed.

You know the part in the movie “You’ve Got Mail” where Meg Ryan gushes about bouquets of newly sharpened pencils? That’s me. The part I love the most about beginning a new trimester is the refreshing intrigue of new classes and “can do'” attitude everyone has in their heart. Not to mention, students at Palmer look much nicer when they’ve actually gotten a healthy amount of sleep for the past 2 weeks.

The part I dislike about the first day of school is reading the syllabus and not lecturing. Get out of my way, syllabus, I have things to learn! This routine is the same in every school on the first day, and many people (many with more education and fancy letters after their names) have told me that this part is necessary, so somewhere in my brain I believe them. Love or hate, my favorite part of this particular first day of 4th trimester was the collective sigh of relief and pleasant smiles as my class welcomed some our favorite returning professors.

There are instructors at Palmer that you are allowed to–and should–adore. I genuinely believe I have had some of the world’s best instructors in my first year at Palmer, and I am excited to learn from what I know will be many more wonderful faculty in my next 6 trimesters.

Beginning to think like a doctor

Hello again! I just completed fourth trimester and I am now beginning the fifth one. I must say, I am excited for this trimester. Instead of feeling like I am sitting in all of my classes and getting “lectured at” (as I felt in some of the basic science classes). I can tell that my professors are encouraging us to engage and interact more.

For example, in my physical diagnosis class, our teacher was doing a mock patient history in which she was the patient and our class had to do a hypothetical case history on her. We were taught the “18 HPI” questions, which basically allow us to gather information about what
brings the patient in that day, and were able to use them in a mock setting. Based on what my classmates and I asked her and what her response was as the patient, we had to try and figure out what her diagnosis was.

Our professor pretended that she had amenorrhea (absence of her menstrual cycle) for four months, blurry vision, headaches and other symptoms. It was up to our class to put the pieces together and figure out that this patient could potentially have a pituitary tumor, also known as an adenoma. This exercise was a neat way to demonstrate how we can gather certain information while taking a patient’s history and put that information together in order to figure out what is  going onwith them.

Another example of a class being more interactive than those in previous trimesters was my Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal class. Our professor put us on the spot and asked, “Front row, which segmental levels are correlated with the biceps muscle?” We all could sense the pressure of him looking for one of us to answer and I blurted out “C5/C6.” I was nervous that my answer wasn’t correct, but thank goodness it ended up being right! I didn’t know how exactly I remembered the correct answer, but it felt good to be asked to think on the spot. At this point in the curriculum, we have learned an abundance of material and I am looking forward to applying a lot of that knowledge in more of a clinical setting now.

Kelly Serra, 5th Trimester Student
Davenport Campus