Sports Council: 3 Day Breast Cancer Walk

The only event of the year where Palmer’s Sports Council camps out for three days in a row–in one big tent, as one big sports medicine team–is the 3 Day Susan G. KomenBreast Cancer Walk. This event is one-of-a-kind and only comes once a year for our school to participate. This year Palmer’s Sports Council had over 30 wonderful volunteers that gave countless hours to thousands of participants to help with one cause, “The Cure” for breast cancer. The volunteers graciously provided their sports medicine and chiropractic skills, while facing many finals back at school and some even facing (National) Boards just days away. However, while they made many sacrifices, every single volunteer will tell you the positive impact of the event by far out-weighs the cost.

During the three days the volunteers were able to advance their skills in taping, soft tissue work and even history taking. The intern volunteers were able to treat dozens of patients for their first chiropractic adjustment and provide services that helped the participants finish the full 60 miles. The doctor and patient interactions at this event are unlike any other because it allows students to have interactions with the same patient for three days in a row and really see the impact that their skills have on real patients.

The 3 Day Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Walk is filled with many people who have been impacted by breast cancer in one way or another and, because of this, there are many emotions that come with the event. The walkers are so thankful for the care we provide, which allows them to cross the finish line. The 3 Day walkers provide such kind words, warm hugs and, best of all, positive attitudes that are contagious. While the sports medicine team worked hard to keep the walkers on the course, the walkers worked hard to finish for the loved ones that they have lost to breast cancer, those who are battling breast cancer, and for those who will fight the battle in the future.  Our time at the event was priceless and allowed us to practice our skills but, best of all, allowed us to give our time to “The Cure.” 

Palmer’s West Campus Sports Council allows us students to really gain hands on, real life experience with patients, which has shown to be an invaluable opportunity for us students. 

Here’s to a great fall quarter!

We just began the second week of fall quarter and I must say it’s crazy to think that I’ve already completed one year here. It’s true what they say about how quickly it moves. I remember back in spinal palpation lab in first quarter, thinking that I would never be able to feel the structures we were asked to find. Everyone said that after a year our skills would improve dramatically. I’m sure it’s all relative, but I would have to agree that it’s amazing how much your hands-on skills improve over the course of your first year. It’s exciting to think how much more I will improve this coming year … and then a year from now it’s clinic time!

It was fun to welcome the new first quarter class last week at various events that were going on at school, such as SPIZZ Night, the all-school Welcome Assembly and the party that the 2nd quarter class always throws for the 1st quarter class. We are no longer the largest class on campus, and we also got to move into a larger room with a window! Small victories! As a Campus Guide, it was fun to see some of the prospective students I had on tours show up as a new students this quarter.

Currently, we 5th quarters have started the frantic rush of studying for our CCEP exam in three weeks. This test is a cumulative review of the material learned in our first year here at Palmer’s West Campus. It involves 14 stations: seven practical and seven written. We will be asked to perform clinical and adjusting skills, along with being asked to do basic diagnosis of common metabolic conditions, etc. It’s kind of overwhelming but at the same fun to review the information!

There are about 10 people from my class that are taking a 100-hour certification course in Applied Kinesiology with a local chiropractor. We have six sessions this quarter and six next quarter. Our first session was great and, while it makes for a long week, it is a great way to bring in a very different aspect to what we learn in school.

As for me, cross country season is in full swing with the team I coach, and we are hoping to have our boys’ team win their league meet in two weeks and move on to state! Here’s to a great fall quarter!

Chiropractic Kids

Being raised by a Chiropractor may be a different experience than being raised by someone who is unfamiliar with the profession. Since chiropractic is a profession and lifestyle, it impacts not only the graduate but also their family. My father is a 1982 Palmer graduate, and my mother is an avid health advocate. The combination of my parents who valued health more than the average American parents led to some interesting and awesome experiences. At points growing up, I felt somewhat embarrassed for being different than my peers, but looking back, I am overwhelming thankful for the way they raised my brothers and myself.

One of the major differences I noticed between my peers and myself was our overall mentality towards health and sickness. In our family, we all knew that if we felt like we may be getting a little cold that it just meant we needed to get adjusted, drinks lots of water, have some tea and get lots of sleep. In a lot of households, name brands like Tylenol, Advil, Nyquil and Pepto-Bismol are a staple, but we just knew that we did not have them in our house or even need them. I’m not saying that all drugs and medications are awful and should not be used, I’m just saying that sometimes they are used too often or when unnecessary. We also were not vaccinated, which is a topic I will save for another blog. My brothers and I were also sick a lot less often than our classmates, except for getting the chicken pox and minor colds here and there.

School lunches were another place that I noticed our “different” lifestyle. I was sometimes disappointed with my peanut butter and jelly on whole wheat bread, carrots and grapes in comparison to my classmate’s lunches that consisted of peanut butter and fluff on white bread, Dunk-a-Roos and Doritos. I didn’t appreciate my “boring” lunches then, but now as an adult, I am so thankful my mom fed us a really healthy diet. Also as far as lifestyle, my parents really value the importance of exercising often. They both did and still do a lot of running, biking, lifting and other physical activities. I was fortunate enough to be driven around to many dance, cheerleading and gymnastics practices since I was in preschool, which gave me a great appreciation for staying active. My brothers were also involved in many different sports including soccer, football, baseball, wrestling and lacrosse.

Getting consistent chiropractic care helped my brothers and I excel within our sports, which was awesome to experience. We were fortunate enough to come home to our Dad and say, “My ankle feels funny, can you please fix my ankle?” and “I got tackled really hard in that game and need an adjustment immediately!” There are definitely perks to being a chiropractic kid, perks I didn’t fully appreciate until I began to pursue the journey of becoming a chiropractor as well. Overall, I feel very blessed to have been raised in a chiropractic family and I hope more people will embrace the chiropractic lifestyle in the future.