Everyone needs a mentor … or two

I think some students may not realize the importance of a mentor. While in school, of course we had our favorite teachers and clinicians that we connected with and sought their opinions. But for me, I never really had a specific mentor. I was content with the fact that after graduation I would have numerous doctors I could call for help.

When I moved back home, I received mixed responses from the other Chiropractors. Some were barely friendly, while others were glad to offer their ear if needed.

One doctor in particular was welcoming and, indeed, this was refreshing for me. I had no other option but to start my own practice; there were no doctors hiring associates and none willing to let me join them even as an exam doctor. (I live on an island and commuting wasn’t an option for me).

So I went for it. I had to. Luckily I became friends with another doctor and ended up working for him part time. As a new business owner and new doctor in a seasonal location, I had to find a part-time job. So I started working for him, simply running his office. This is hardly the ideal situation for a new Chiropractor, but I had to work somewhere, and I thought this was acceptable since I was still in a Chiropractor’s office.

Months later, this doctor has become my mentor, and I’ve realized that this relationship is invaluable for a new doctor and new business owner. Although I graduated with full confidence of my ability to diagnose and treat spinal complaints, I quickly realized that there was a huge gap in my education. Not that I blame Palmer at all, it’s just that much of it is learned by trial and error. Although I am glad that I started my own business right out of school, I highly recommend to whomever chooses to go this route to have a mentor. Right now I am still running my mentor’s office part-time, which is another invaluable experience. Even though I’ve worked in customer service before, working in a doctor’s office is completely different. I have a whole new respect for the person who runs the front desk.

Luckily, I also have my mentor’s team as a resource as well. Not only have they been in business for 20 years, but their insurance knowledge is vast. Even if we covered more on insurances in school, it probably would not be enough.

Much of what I’ve learned for insurance has been trial and error, so having another resource is essential. Although both the ACA and my state organization provide doctors with insurance resources, it’s not enough.

A mentor is an important resource, and they can be valuable for your practice growth. Not only am I able to discuss patient cases and get a second opinion if needed, I can easily access a successful business model, remove some of the stress of the insurance maze (that is often overwhelming) and improve my own personal and business skills. But perhaps most importantly, I have a network of people who want to see me be successful and are willing to help me get there. This alone is the most valuable of all.

Sincerely,

Kimberly Burke, D.C. (Florida Campus, Class 113, 2011)

Oak Bluffs, MA

www.islandspinecenter.com

I sent 40 prospective students to Palmer

Earlier this month, Dr. James Caballero sent an e-mail to Palmer, which said he was sending the names of 40 prospective students to the College. Here’s how he did it and why. –Editor

The 28th Annual Career Fair at the Oxnard Community Center in Oxnard, Calif., was held earlier this month. This was my sixth or seventh year attending the fair to promote Palmer College. But I’ve also participated in other career fairs, including one at Pepperdine University in Malibu.

I got involved in recruiting for Palmer about 10 years ago. They asked me, and I decided it would be a great way to contribute to PCC. I have always talked to students, patients and others who were interested in chiropractic. But the only one I officially sent was my son, Dr. James A. Caballero. He attended PCC San Jose (Palmer’s West Campus) and graduated in 1991. He has an active practice in San Diego.

To all alumni I would simply say that recruiting students is the best way to help Palmer and our profession. It also gives you good exposure. Most fairs are put on by school districts, and they really appreciate our attendance as presenters.

Doing a booth at a fair is really easy. All I ask the students who approach is, “Are you interested in the health field?” They usually say yes, then I follow up with, “Fill out this card, and Palmer College will send you information on becoming a Doctor of Chiropractic.” They generally fill out the card. It is surprising how many are thinking about chiropractic! Also, at this last fair, most of the sign-ups were young women.

By the way, at this fair I was approached by the city of Ventura, Calif. They asked me to be in their first Career/Job/Volunteer Expo on May 17.

If you are interested in attending recruitments for Palmer, contact the Alumni Office at alumni@palmer.edu and they’ll set you up with plenty of information and materials.

Best regards,

James Caballero, D.C. (Davenport ’74)

 

The wonders of chiropractic

I graduated in 1978 at PCC and feel fortunate to have learned chiropractic adjusting and the Toggle Recoil. Back in those days, they allowed visiting doctors to teach seminars. I feel very lucky to have studied with Dr. Bernard Jenson (Nutrition), Dr. Raymond Nimmo (Receptor Tonus) Trigger Point Therapy. I forget the name of the French doctor that taught Polarity.

I was introduced to the Activator Method, SOT, Pierce Stillwagon, Thompson and more. I want to thank all my instructors for helping me realize that the power of healing comes from within, and it is better to promote health than to fight dis-ease. We become doctors of chiropractic to help our community and make our world a better place.

Learn and practice to be excellent in your healing art. The Spirit interfaces with our body and brain. The brain communicates this intelligence and energy with the body through the nervous system. Energy needs to move. Find the interference, remove it, bring more balance to the being, and health will follow.

– Doyle Rood, D.C. (Davenport ’78)