Get to know Palmer alumni – Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Get to know … Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Dr. O’Tool found early success in his private practice by improving his patient’s health and providing leadership within his community. He says Palmer College set him up for success through the business and leadership programs available on campus.

Check out this videon where Dr. O’Tool talks about his private practice and community leadership.

Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Share this story with potential chiropractors you know!

Would you like to share your Palmer story? Contact Minda at minda.powers@palmer.edu.

Dr. Charles Fulk – Reflections of a PCC Alumnus

Dr. Charles Fulk

Dr. Charles Fulk

As Palmer College of Chiropractic alumnus starting my 34th year in practice, I have often reflected on the years I spent at PCC and how they have prepared me for practice life. I graduated from PCC in December of 1982 and began practicing in January of 1983 in Kansas.

The education I received was very thorough, but at the time I wondered why it seemed so redundant. The classes seemed to march us through one body system to another, but I soon realized that the closure of each class laid the framework and understanding that I needed to more fully understand the next.

When I entered practice life in 1983, I realized that the education I had received during my time at PCC was the very foundation I needed to develop and grow my practice.

From anatomy and physiology, to manipulation technique classes, to understanding X-rays, they all seemed to knit together the knowledge, understanding and confidence I needed to test, correctly diagnose and then effectively care for people.

I spent my days exploring the mysteries of the human body and developed the competence and confidence that I needed to restore my patients’ health.

I went into the chiropractic field mission-focused and with a passion for helping people. I was thankful for the opportunity to care for others and felt honored to have the ability to diagnose and treat them.

The trust they put in me was inspiring. The close nature of the doctor-patient relationship that is formed in a matter of minutes during a consultation made me proud of the education I had received and the person I had become.

However, early in my career, I found it challenging to get my practice going, and it was even more difficult to learn how to manage my staff and patients it as it grew.

I soon discovered the challenges of the economic side of being a chiropractor. Financial tasks distanced me from the reasons I had chosen chiropractic in the first place. That’s the duality of being a chiropractor. There’s the fulfilling personal side and the difficult impersonal side.

I soon discovered that chiropractic is not a profession for the “thin skinned” individual or the “faint of heart.” I began to build around myself with experts in the fields of business management, marketing and accounting, and this soon freed me up to focus on what I love most, helping people.

Although the field of chiropractic may be challenging, it is an extremely rewarding profession that can bring an incredible sense of satisfaction and purpose. The education I received at PCC gave me the foundation of knowledge to build my practice and withstand the inevitable storms of practice life.

Chiropractic is an incredible product for the consumer and, when delivered with commitment and passion, will yield tremendous benefits. Thank you, PCC.

 

Charles Fulk, D.C. practices at Fulk Chiropractic in Olathe, KS.  Open seven days a week, Fulk’s 11 chiropractors offer chiropractic treatment to Kansas City-area patients when they need it most. 

Advice for chiropractic students: Be open-minded

Palmer alumni offer their advice to chiropractic students on how to achieve success. Do you have advice you’d like to share with current Palmer students or new graduates? Emailminda.powers@palmer.edu.

“Be open-minded, respectful of other opinions, and understand it’s not how great a technique is but it’s about applying the right technique at the right time. Patients don’t care how they get fixed (most of the time). They want you to teach them about what is creating their issues and how you are going to take care of them. I use upper cervical as a primary but utilize all other forms of adjustments as needed for the right presentation of issues.

“So, in short, don’t use a hammer for a screw. Apply your knowledge and the techniques that you learn to properly take care of the issue. Don’t get caught up in the hype of negativity. If you focus on that, you will become that. If there is an opportunity to address something and properly fix it, then go for it. But words without actions produce zero results.

“Learn as much as you can. Even the random stuff they teach [in class] may become useful. I’ve [discovered] cases of severe issues due to the teachings from my professors at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport. We find and fix subluxations, but be ready to answer all questions regarding health because you never know what you will encounter.”

– Brandon Blank, D.C.

Advice for chiropractic students from chiropractors

Palmer alumni offer their advice to chiropractic students on how to achieve success. Do you have advice you’d like to share with current Palmer students or new graduates? Email minda.powers@palmer.edu.

“My advice is to find successful people you respect and would like to be like AND listen to what they have to say. Also, don’t ever take advice from anyone who is failing or struggling. Learn how to be awesome from awesome people.”

– Brad Meylor, D.C.

Advice for new chiropractors

Each week, we’re asking our alumni to share their advice and experiences on the Alumni Voices blog. This week, P. Burdoc Nisson, D.C., shares his personal list of Do’s and Don’ts for new chiropractors.

If you would like to share your own practicing tips and more, follow @palmercollege on Twitter and like our Facebook page to see the weekly question on Wednesdays.

Dr. Burdoc Nisson

Dr. Burdoc Nisson and grandbaby

Do’s & Don’ts:

1. Make sure that you are in the best health that you can be (get adjusted, eat well, etc.).

2. Make sure that you have everything to help the patient that they are read for.

3. Don’t overwhelm the patient.

4. Do what the patient’s body wants done first, check if that worked and then find the next thing that patient’s body wants now.

5. If the patient’s body is not telling you what is next but is not “done,” try having them move, walk or rest.

6. If the patient comes back the next time feeling exactly the same, find out what you missed.

7. Get to know which local health practitioners do things differently than you do so that you can refer to each other.

8. Refer patients when they are not improving fast enough.

9. Use all of your senses to work with the whole patient (physical, emotional, causal, mental, spiritual).

10. Keep learning.

– Dr. P. Burdoc Nisson

Chiropractors: How important is it to have a mentor?

We got on Facebook and Twitter and asked how important you think it is to have a mentor as a chiropractic student and as a chiropractor. Here are some of the answers:

“Only if you want to be successful.”    – Bobby Moore, D.C.

“VERY, VERY IMPORTANT!!!”    – Brad Meylor, D.C.

“It is of the utmost importance! I was surprised at how few students had mentors while I attended Palmer.”    – Brandon Perrine, D.C.

“I have had some great mentors in my life. Although I most often just stumbled into them, keep your eyes open. They can help you become so much better than you expected to be. I was blessed with two on-campus mentors while a student at Palmer. A mentor can make the difference between you becoming an okay chiropractor and a great chiropractor.”    – Doc Nisson

“Everyone can use a good mentor. I am thankful for all the mentors I’ve had in starting my chiropractic practice.”    – @ChiroLasVegas, Twitter

What do you think? Tweet us @palmercollege, post on Facebook or leave a comment below.