Dr. Charles Fulk – Reflections of a PCC Alumnus

Dr. Charles Fulk

Dr. Charles Fulk

As Palmer College of Chiropractic alumnus starting my 34th year in practice, I have often reflected on the years I spent at PCC and how they have prepared me for practice life. I graduated from PCC in December of 1982 and began practicing in January of 1983 in Kansas.

The education I received was very thorough, but at the time I wondered why it seemed so redundant. The classes seemed to march us through one body system to another, but I soon realized that the closure of each class laid the framework and understanding that I needed to more fully understand the next.

When I entered practice life in 1983, I realized that the education I had received during my time at PCC was the very foundation I needed to develop and grow my practice.

From anatomy and physiology, to manipulation technique classes, to understanding X-rays, they all seemed to knit together the knowledge, understanding and confidence I needed to test, correctly diagnose and then effectively care for people.

I spent my days exploring the mysteries of the human body and developed the competence and confidence that I needed to restore my patients’ health.

I went into the chiropractic field mission-focused and with a passion for helping people. I was thankful for the opportunity to care for others and felt honored to have the ability to diagnose and treat them.

The trust they put in me was inspiring. The close nature of the doctor-patient relationship that is formed in a matter of minutes during a consultation made me proud of the education I had received and the person I had become.

However, early in my career, I found it challenging to get my practice going, and it was even more difficult to learn how to manage my staff and patients it as it grew.

I soon discovered the challenges of the economic side of being a chiropractor. Financial tasks distanced me from the reasons I had chosen chiropractic in the first place. That’s the duality of being a chiropractor. There’s the fulfilling personal side and the difficult impersonal side.

I soon discovered that chiropractic is not a profession for the “thin skinned” individual or the “faint of heart.” I began to build around myself with experts in the fields of business management, marketing and accounting, and this soon freed me up to focus on what I love most, helping people.

Although the field of chiropractic may be challenging, it is an extremely rewarding profession that can bring an incredible sense of satisfaction and purpose. The education I received at PCC gave me the foundation of knowledge to build my practice and withstand the inevitable storms of practice life.

Chiropractic is an incredible product for the consumer and, when delivered with commitment and passion, will yield tremendous benefits. Thank you, PCC.

 

Charles Fulk, D.C. practices at Fulk Chiropractic in Olathe, KS.  Open seven days a week, Fulk’s 11 chiropractors offer chiropractic treatment to Kansas City-area patients when they need it most. 

The best advice I received from a chiropractor was …

Some of B.J. Palmer's original epigrams around the Davenport, Iowa, Campus.

Some of B.J. Palmer’s original epigrams around the Davenport, Iowa, Campus.

We went on Facebook and asked our alumni, “What’s the best advice you ever received form a chiropractor?”

Here are their answers:

• Dr. Jon Søvik – “You should become a chiropractor.” – Atle Aarre, D.C., ’91 alumnus

• Dr. Brad Yee – “… to study to be a chiropractor ….”

• Dr. Karen Doherty – “Why be a C.A. when you could be a Chiropractor?” asked my student doctor Alliette Pike. That was in June 1977. That question changed my life. PCC ’81”

• Livtar Khalsa – “Exercise!”

• Dr. Bob Kauffman – “Early to bed, early to rise, work like hell and advertise!” – Dr. B.J. Palmer via epigram (of course!)”

What’s the best advice you’ve received? Leave it in the comments below.