Get to know Palmer alumni – Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Get to know … Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Dr. O’Tool found early success in his private practice by improving his patient’s health and providing leadership within his community. He says Palmer College set him up for success through the business and leadership programs available on campus.

Check out this videon where Dr. O’Tool talks about his private practice and community leadership.

Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Share this story with potential chiropractors you know!

Would you like to share your Palmer story? Contact Minda at minda.powers@palmer.edu.

Dr. Charles Fulk – Reflections of a PCC Alumnus

Dr. Charles Fulk

Dr. Charles Fulk

As Palmer College of Chiropractic alumnus starting my 34th year in practice, I have often reflected on the years I spent at PCC and how they have prepared me for practice life. I graduated from PCC in December of 1982 and began practicing in January of 1983 in Kansas.

The education I received was very thorough, but at the time I wondered why it seemed so redundant. The classes seemed to march us through one body system to another, but I soon realized that the closure of each class laid the framework and understanding that I needed to more fully understand the next.

When I entered practice life in 1983, I realized that the education I had received during my time at PCC was the very foundation I needed to develop and grow my practice.

From anatomy and physiology, to manipulation technique classes, to understanding X-rays, they all seemed to knit together the knowledge, understanding and confidence I needed to test, correctly diagnose and then effectively care for people.

I spent my days exploring the mysteries of the human body and developed the competence and confidence that I needed to restore my patients’ health.

I went into the chiropractic field mission-focused and with a passion for helping people. I was thankful for the opportunity to care for others and felt honored to have the ability to diagnose and treat them.

The trust they put in me was inspiring. The close nature of the doctor-patient relationship that is formed in a matter of minutes during a consultation made me proud of the education I had received and the person I had become.

However, early in my career, I found it challenging to get my practice going, and it was even more difficult to learn how to manage my staff and patients it as it grew.

I soon discovered the challenges of the economic side of being a chiropractor. Financial tasks distanced me from the reasons I had chosen chiropractic in the first place. That’s the duality of being a chiropractor. There’s the fulfilling personal side and the difficult impersonal side.

I soon discovered that chiropractic is not a profession for the “thin skinned” individual or the “faint of heart.” I began to build around myself with experts in the fields of business management, marketing and accounting, and this soon freed me up to focus on what I love most, helping people.

Although the field of chiropractic may be challenging, it is an extremely rewarding profession that can bring an incredible sense of satisfaction and purpose. The education I received at PCC gave me the foundation of knowledge to build my practice and withstand the inevitable storms of practice life.

Chiropractic is an incredible product for the consumer and, when delivered with commitment and passion, will yield tremendous benefits. Thank you, PCC.

 

Charles Fulk, D.C. practices at Fulk Chiropractic in Olathe, KS.  Open seven days a week, Fulk’s 11 chiropractors offer chiropractic treatment to Kansas City-area patients when they need it most. 

An Epidemic Spine Problem In Our Society, Forward Head Posture

By Gregory E. Johnson, D.C. (Davenport campus ’81)

Forward Head Posture & Its Damaging Effects On Our Health

One of the most common problems we see at our office, Advanced Chiropractic Relief , that causes neck and/or low back pain is Forward Head Posture (FHP), which increases the gravitational weight-bearing forces and creates abnormal compressive stresses on the muscles, ligaments, disc and joints of the spine.

Dr. Gregory Johnson

Dr. Gregory Johnson

This aberrant compression stress on disc, muscles, ligaments and joints of the spine can cause three to four times the amount of stress on the muscles, disc and ligaments. If left uncorrected, it will cause the nerves that exit the spine to function abnormally (known as a pinched nerve), causing a variety of different health problems. These may include headaches, simple tension in the neck, upper back, shoulders mid back and all the way down to the lower back and pelvis. It can also cause more serious spinal conditions like bulged and/or herniated disc, as well as degenerative disc.

Gravity is always pulling us down towards the earth 24/7, whether you’re sitting, standing, sleeping, walking or doing any other activity a human being might do during their everyday activities of living, both at work and at home. We have become a sedentary society for the most part, sitting most of the day as we work on a computer or at a desk with our heads leaning or bent forward from our shoulders. This means FHP is very prevalent in our society. Not only does it cause serious postural problems, it can also cause compression of the upper cavity and lower cavity, which includes the lungs, heart and vasculature out of the upper chest cavity and above the diaphragm (which can lead to hiatal hernia conditions or other gastrointestinal conditions.

Our children are already showing signs of having FHP in their lives with school work, computers, handhelds, cell phones and other high tech devices (i.e. gaming controllers like X-Box, Playstation, Nintendo and others as well). You will see that this younger generation will have more spinal problems than any other generation to date because of their aberrant posture on a daily basis.

Posture is a mirror of spinal bio-mechanics, and if your posture is bad, so is your spinal alignment (bio-mechanics). One must remain vigilant when performing any activity of daily living, such as sitting, standing, sleeping, bending, twisting and rotating to make sure we are doing it in a manner consistent with normal upright posture.

If you look at pictures taken of you earlier in life from the side view, you would be able to see if you have had FHP for a while or not. Professional analysis of your posture is the best way to know for sure. Chiropractors are experts at evaluating posture and spinal alignment.

Your Houston Chiropractor,
Dr. Gregory Johnson

This post was originally published on Dr. Johnson’s blog, Your Houston Chiropractor Dr. Gregory Johnson. The above edited  was content posted here with permission. Visit Dr. Johnson’s YouTube channel to see his videos about chiropractic.

 

 

Is It Really Tendonitis? – by Dr. Cody Scharf

Tendinitis and tendinosis. One you’ve probably heard before.  The other, probably not. While they both sound the same, in reality they are worlds apart. Let’s compare.

Tendinitis is, by definition, inflammation of a tendon.  Tendinosis on the other hand is defined as chronic tendinitis and implies chronic tendon degeneration without the presence of inflammation. Basically, one is short-term with inflammation, the other long-term, without inflammation, though both are caused typically by overuse.

soccerTendinitis, the most popular diagnosis of the two, usually presents with swelling and tenderness at the sight of pain, often accompanied by stiffness, and less often by weakness. Tendinosis presents most often with stiffness, tenderness to the touch, and weakness–almost identical to tendinitis. Recovery of tendinitis lasts anywhere from days to six weeks, a relatively “quick fix.” Tendinosis recovery can last a few short weeks to a couple months or more depending on the level of degeneration. If left untreated, tendinosis often leads to “tear” injuries.

While both conditions are classically treated with conservative measures, the difference in care is absolutely critical to resolution of the problem. Conservative management stems around rest and anti-inflammatory medication for tendinitis, while conservative management of tendinosis aims to restore tendon regrowth and strength through manual therapy and eccentric exercise.

Tendinitis and tendinosis, both, occur most often in the Achilles tendon (ankle), patellar tendon (knee), proximal hamstring (high hamstring), common extensor tendon (elbow), and the supraspinatus tendon (shoulder).

With both of these problems being so relatively close, while treatment is vastly different, proper diagnosis is vital to the recovery process! So which one do you have? Let’s go to the research.

While tendinitis is the wildly over-popular diagnosis among general practitioners, it may not be the case. Most research coming out on this topic is now showing that at a cellular level, once believed tendinitis actually is, in fact, tendinosis.

According to Almekinders and Temple, “Most currently practicing general practitioners were taught, and many still believe, that patients who present with overuse tendinitis have a largely inflammatory condition and will benefit from anti-inflammatory medication. Unfortunately this dogma is deeply entrenched. Ten of 11 readily available sports medicine texts specifically recommend non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs despite the lack of clinical evidence.”

In light of this, chances are that if you have been diagnosed with tendinitis the diagnosis was incorrect. Furthermore, traditional, conservative treatment, of such, with the use of anti-inflammatories, corticosteroid injections, and/or pain medication may have left you worse off long term even though pain may have dissipated short term (but this conversation is for a different time). These methods were designed to eliminate inflammation, not regrow tendon. As mentioned above, treatment of tendinosis should be aimed at restoring tendon function and strength through manual therapy and eccentric exercise. Drugs will not help! Treatment should also include load management when deemed necessary.

With all this said, while we cannot assume a tendinitis diagnosis was incorrect, lingering, worsening, or reoccurrence of pain would suggest that it may in fact be tendinosis. It is recommended that treatment plans geared toward tendinitis, in these cases, be reevaluated.

Tendinitis is one of the most commonly diagnosed injuries and all too many struggle to find relief. With the proper diagnosis and treatment plan, it doesn’t have to be that way!

– Cody Scharf, D.C., Davenport ’04

 

Originally posted on Dr. Scharf’s blog. Republished with permission.

Resource:
Almekinders LC, Temple JD. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of tendonitis: an analysis of the literature.Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1998;30:1183–1190.

The best advice I received from a chiropractor was …

Some of B.J. Palmer's original epigrams around the Davenport, Iowa, Campus.

Some of B.J. Palmer’s original epigrams around the Davenport, Iowa, Campus.

We went on Facebook and asked our alumni, “What’s the best advice you ever received form a chiropractor?”

Here are their answers:

• Dr. Jon Søvik – “You should become a chiropractor.” – Atle Aarre, D.C., ’91 alumnus

• Dr. Brad Yee – “… to study to be a chiropractor ….”

• Dr. Karen Doherty – “Why be a C.A. when you could be a Chiropractor?” asked my student doctor Alliette Pike. That was in June 1977. That question changed my life. PCC ’81”

• Livtar Khalsa – “Exercise!”

• Dr. Bob Kauffman – “Early to bed, early to rise, work like hell and advertise!” – Dr. B.J. Palmer via epigram (of course!)”

What’s the best advice you’ve received? Leave it in the comments below.

My chiropractic miracle: My baby, home where she belonged

My wife was a brittle diabetic and developed preeclampsia. In 1978 my daughter, Sara, was born, c-section, six weeks early. Standard medical practice was for premature newborns to remain in the hospital until their due date—in this case, for six more weeks.

I was able to suit up and visit my daughter in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) multiple times each day. Little Sara had tubes everywhere. A tube to her lungs prevented any noise from her attempted cries. Her arms and legs were flailing about whenever she was awake.

One day, I walked around the incubator and contacted Sara behind her ear, first on one side, then the other. I moved my finger around contacting at different directions with very light force. When I hit the right angle, Sara instantly calmed down, stopped flailing her limbs and went to sleep—all vitals normal.

When the nurse wanted to stop me and asked the chief resident how to approach me, the resident said (and I heard his comment), “He’s her father, let him be. He may know something we don’t.” He knew I was a chiropractor.

Now that Sara was doing so much better, they could no longer justify keeping her in the hospital after two weeks. She came home perfectly normal and is now 35 years old.

Barry Isaacson, D.C. (Davenport ’75)

 

Chiropractic miracles: Hope for the hopeless

We have seen incredible changes in individuals since our office opened in 1986. Specific chiropractic has had a rich history in seeing sick people get well and in seeing seemingly hopeless cases turn around. I’ve compiled a number of examples on our website of people who have greatly benefited from chiropractic care. Visit the Results page to read more.

In health,

Joseph A. La Barbera (Davenport ’85)

Hard work, cigarette butts and the value of chiropractic

Dr. Joe and an infant patient

My dad, Jack, passed away last month, and not a day goes by I don’t think about him and the role he played in helping me become the person I am today. He worked as a landscaper, but that only begins to describe the range of jobs he took on to provide for me and my five brothers and sisters. And despite all the early mornings and long hours, often it wasn’t enough. But he never became discouraged–that just meant it was time to get creative.

There was one chiropractor in our hometown, and although I’ll never know the specifics, he and my father had an arrangement where my dad would do all the landscaping outside his business, and in exchange the doctor would provide free chiropractic for our family. I can remember once, after a huge snowstorm, my father grabbing the shovel and walked two miles uphill, through the unpaved streets, to shovel this man’s parking lot. That’s how important he thought it was for us to receive chiropractic care.

Now that doesn’t mean my dad did all the work himself; sometimes he would have me and my brother, Jon, help him. My job always was to pick the cigarette butts out of the lava rocks in front of the office. I HATED this job. I couldn’t kneel down on them because they hurt my knees, and stooping over for too long hurt my back. I hated cigarette butts, I hated smokers, I hated the stupid lava rocks and whoever put them there in the first place. But my dad was not one to negotiate. I can still hear his voice to this day: “Make sure you don’t miss any of those butts.”

Thankfully, I never associated any of that dislike with chiropractic. I went on to study chiropractic at Palmer, graduating twenty-five years ago, in 1988. Today, Grice Chiropractic has two offices in Pittsburgh, staffed by four Palmer grads. I love my work with our patients, and I love my work with the State Board of Chiropractic, where I get to work with great chiropractic professionals and oversee the integrity of chiropractic practice across the Commonwealth.

I like to think none of this would have happened were it not for my dad. He valued chiropractic so much that he was willing to do work extra, without pay, to ensure his children received the best care. If there is any advice I can provide to those considering a career in chiropractic, it is the same that my dad shared with me so many years ago: the value of chiropractic is something to be held in the highest esteem.

Dr. Joseph T. Grice (Davenport ’88)

http://www.gricechiropractic.com

http://www.facebook.com/gricechiropractic

Why I became a chiropractor

Dr. David Palmer

I was born in 1935 and grew up with a father who was a 1923 Palmer School of Chiropractic graduate. All my young life I received chiropractic care from Dad. My first experience with a medical doctor was when I ran a nail into my knee. Then at the ripe old age of 14, I learned what an aspirin was. I developed a bad toothache, and Dad went and bought a bottle of aspirin and made an ice pack to kill the pain until we could get to my uncle who was a dentist.

Over the years I observed the multitude of patients coming to the home office to see my father. After college, I took a teaching job in Cincinnati where my wife Marilyn and I settled. Then I went to the University of Cincinnati for a graduate degree. While working part time for the University, I was offered a full-time position and became the director of Financial Aid. I worked for the University from 1960 to 1965 and decided to visit the Palmer College of Chiropractic with my wife in the fall of l964. In the winter of l965, I decided to quit the rat race of college administration and the working 60 to 70 hours a week and become a Chiropractor. I enrolled in the spring of 1965.

However, as good luck could happen, Dr. Dave Palmer decided to open the Palmer Junior College at that time and asked me to work in the junior college. It was a late-afternoon and evening program and would work well with my studies at Palmer College of Chiropractic.

I will always thank Palmer and Dr. Dave for my education and for the many years since 1968 when I graduated. I try to be generous and in the l980s was instrumental in forming the Indiana Palmer College of Chiropractic International Alumni Association Endowed Scholarship Program, which today offers two $1,200 scholarships a year. Then, after seeing that off the ground and doing well, I have sponsored a scholarship for a student that is an Eagle Scout. To this day I continue contributing to this Eagle Scout fund.

God bless Chiropractic and God bless Palmer,

Ronald W. Woods, D.C., PCC ’68, son of Dr. Ralph Cook Woods, D.C., PSC ’23

Chiropractic changed my life

Chiropractic changed and saved my life. I remember I was in 6th grade. I was rough-housing with my sister and fell off the couch. I hit my head on the coffee table and subluxated my upper thoracic vertebra. It had been a couple of months when I started developing severe asthma, and I had never had asthma before my entire life.

Dr. Greg Johnson adjusting one of his patients.

I went to every allergy and asthma specialist in the tri-state area. All they did was give me pills and allergy shots for the next two years. My asthma got so bad that I was taken to the hospital and put in an oxygen tent, shot me up with epinephrine, and I had to quit playing all my sports activities.

Finally a friend of my mom’s referred her to a chiropractor who was a Palmer graduate that had helped another child with their asthma. She took me to him, and within three months of being treated by this Palmer graduate, I had no more asthma.

I knew in the 8th grade I was going to be a chiropractor. Traditional medicine failed me miserably. I knew I wanted to go to Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa because I wanted to go to the best school for chiropractic in the world. Palmer has always been The Fountainhead of chiropractic, and I graduated from Palmer in Davenport in 1981.

I have treated tens of thousands of patients in my 32 years of practice. I am as passionate about chiropractic now as I was then. I see chiropractic changing people’s lives every day and have had several patients go to Palmer themselves after being treated by me. I believe strongly that Palmer College chiropractic teaches their students how to adjust the spine better than any chiropractic college in the United States. I am now sharing what chiropractic benefits are for people on YouTube.

I encourage every Palmer graduate to continue to educate the world about the benefits of chiropractic care. Continuing education is also very important for your continued development and skills. Becoming a chiropractor and going to Palmer College was the best thing that could’ve ever happened to me. I believe every chiropractor should visit Palmer  in Davenport  just to see where chiropractic actually came from.

If I could pass any tips along to Palmer students, it would be to study hard and really learn about the spine and the nervous system. Chiropractic is about so much more than just “cracking” necks and backs. Chiropractic philosophy is exactly the way B.J. Palmer taught it in his day. The vertebral subluxation complex does exist, and correction of this disorder will save many lives. Chiropractic is the most rewarding profession anyone could ever be in. Don’t forget to keep getting adjusted yourselves throughout your professional career. Keep changing lives through chiropractic care.

Sincerely,

Your Houston Chiropractor

Dr. Gregory E. Johnson D.C.

Davenport Campus, Class of 1981