Get to know Palmer alumni – Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Get to know … Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Dr. O’Tool found early success in his private practice by improving his patient’s health and providing leadership within his community. He says Palmer College set him up for success through the business and leadership programs available on campus.

Check out this videon where Dr. O’Tool talks about his private practice and community leadership.

Joe O’Tool, D.C.

Share this story with potential chiropractors you know!

Would you like to share your Palmer story? Contact Minda at minda.powers@palmer.edu.

An Epidemic Spine Problem In Our Society, Forward Head Posture

By Gregory E. Johnson, D.C. (Davenport campus ’81)

Forward Head Posture & Its Damaging Effects On Our Health

One of the most common problems we see at our office, Advanced Chiropractic Relief , that causes neck and/or low back pain is Forward Head Posture (FHP), which increases the gravitational weight-bearing forces and creates abnormal compressive stresses on the muscles, ligaments, disc and joints of the spine.

Dr. Gregory Johnson

Dr. Gregory Johnson

This aberrant compression stress on disc, muscles, ligaments and joints of the spine can cause three to four times the amount of stress on the muscles, disc and ligaments. If left uncorrected, it will cause the nerves that exit the spine to function abnormally (known as a pinched nerve), causing a variety of different health problems. These may include headaches, simple tension in the neck, upper back, shoulders mid back and all the way down to the lower back and pelvis. It can also cause more serious spinal conditions like bulged and/or herniated disc, as well as degenerative disc.

Gravity is always pulling us down towards the earth 24/7, whether you’re sitting, standing, sleeping, walking or doing any other activity a human being might do during their everyday activities of living, both at work and at home. We have become a sedentary society for the most part, sitting most of the day as we work on a computer or at a desk with our heads leaning or bent forward from our shoulders. This means FHP is very prevalent in our society. Not only does it cause serious postural problems, it can also cause compression of the upper cavity and lower cavity, which includes the lungs, heart and vasculature out of the upper chest cavity and above the diaphragm (which can lead to hiatal hernia conditions or other gastrointestinal conditions.

Our children are already showing signs of having FHP in their lives with school work, computers, handhelds, cell phones and other high tech devices (i.e. gaming controllers like X-Box, Playstation, Nintendo and others as well). You will see that this younger generation will have more spinal problems than any other generation to date because of their aberrant posture on a daily basis.

Posture is a mirror of spinal bio-mechanics, and if your posture is bad, so is your spinal alignment (bio-mechanics). One must remain vigilant when performing any activity of daily living, such as sitting, standing, sleeping, bending, twisting and rotating to make sure we are doing it in a manner consistent with normal upright posture.

If you look at pictures taken of you earlier in life from the side view, you would be able to see if you have had FHP for a while or not. Professional analysis of your posture is the best way to know for sure. Chiropractors are experts at evaluating posture and spinal alignment.

Your Houston Chiropractor,
Dr. Gregory Johnson

This post was originally published on Dr. Johnson’s blog, Your Houston Chiropractor Dr. Gregory Johnson. The above edited  was content posted here with permission. Visit Dr. Johnson’s YouTube channel to see his videos about chiropractic.

 

 

The best advice I received from a chiropractor was …

Some of B.J. Palmer's original epigrams around the Davenport, Iowa, Campus.

Some of B.J. Palmer’s original epigrams around the Davenport, Iowa, Campus.

We went on Facebook and asked our alumni, “What’s the best advice you ever received form a chiropractor?”

Here are their answers:

• Dr. Jon Søvik – “You should become a chiropractor.” – Atle Aarre, D.C., ’91 alumnus

• Dr. Brad Yee – “… to study to be a chiropractor ….”

• Dr. Karen Doherty – “Why be a C.A. when you could be a Chiropractor?” asked my student doctor Alliette Pike. That was in June 1977. That question changed my life. PCC ’81”

• Livtar Khalsa – “Exercise!”

• Dr. Bob Kauffman – “Early to bed, early to rise, work like hell and advertise!” – Dr. B.J. Palmer via epigram (of course!)”

What’s the best advice you’ve received? Leave it in the comments below.

Chiropractors: How important is it to have a mentor?

We got on Facebook and Twitter and asked how important you think it is to have a mentor as a chiropractic student and as a chiropractor. Here are some of the answers:

“Only if you want to be successful.”    – Bobby Moore, D.C.

“VERY, VERY IMPORTANT!!!”    – Brad Meylor, D.C.

“It is of the utmost importance! I was surprised at how few students had mentors while I attended Palmer.”    – Brandon Perrine, D.C.

“I have had some great mentors in my life. Although I most often just stumbled into them, keep your eyes open. They can help you become so much better than you expected to be. I was blessed with two on-campus mentors while a student at Palmer. A mentor can make the difference between you becoming an okay chiropractor and a great chiropractor.”    – Doc Nisson

“Everyone can use a good mentor. I am thankful for all the mentors I’ve had in starting my chiropractic practice.”    – @ChiroLasVegas, Twitter

What do you think? Tweet us @palmercollege, post on Facebook or leave a comment below.

My chiropractic miracle: My baby, home where she belonged

My wife was a brittle diabetic and developed preeclampsia. In 1978 my daughter, Sara, was born, c-section, six weeks early. Standard medical practice was for premature newborns to remain in the hospital until their due date—in this case, for six more weeks.

I was able to suit up and visit my daughter in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) multiple times each day. Little Sara had tubes everywhere. A tube to her lungs prevented any noise from her attempted cries. Her arms and legs were flailing about whenever she was awake.

One day, I walked around the incubator and contacted Sara behind her ear, first on one side, then the other. I moved my finger around contacting at different directions with very light force. When I hit the right angle, Sara instantly calmed down, stopped flailing her limbs and went to sleep—all vitals normal.

When the nurse wanted to stop me and asked the chief resident how to approach me, the resident said (and I heard his comment), “He’s her father, let him be. He may know something we don’t.” He knew I was a chiropractor.

Now that Sara was doing so much better, they could no longer justify keeping her in the hospital after two weeks. She came home perfectly normal and is now 35 years old.

Barry Isaacson, D.C. (Davenport ’75)

 

Chiropractic miracles: Hope for the hopeless

We have seen incredible changes in individuals since our office opened in 1986. Specific chiropractic has had a rich history in seeing sick people get well and in seeing seemingly hopeless cases turn around. I’ve compiled a number of examples on our website of people who have greatly benefited from chiropractic care. Visit the Results page to read more.

In health,

Joseph A. La Barbera (Davenport ’85)

My chiropractic miracle: The gift of time

Several years ago I was asked by one of my regular patients if I made home visits. I replied that I did when the situation called for it. He then asked what I was doing at lunchtime today. That day, he took me to meet a man named Jim.

Jim lived in a one-story ranch style home attached to the end of a 50-foot oxygen hose. The hose was attached to a machine that generated oxygen. Jim was captured in WWII and, while a prisoner of war, had pneumonia among other conditions. When he returned home, he worked refinishing gymnasium floors. As a result he was barely able to breathe at the time Jim and I met. He told me breathing to him was like trying to breathe through a drinking straw. He wanted to know if there was anything I could do to try to help him with the severe neck pain he was having. He was bluish in coloring due to the lack of oxygen.

I started working on Jim that evening after I finished with patients. I would go to his house three times per week. His neck pain improved, and he began to report that it was easier to breathe. Plus, his coloring was improving.

One day I received a call from Jim’s wife that he was in the hospital with pneumonia and would I consider coming there to help him. I did as requested and soon he was out of the hospital. I continued to make home visits.

One Monday evening as I arrived at Jim’s home, I noticed a lot of strange cars in the driveway. I carried my portable table to the door, which was answered by a crying woman. She apologized for not calling to cancel my visit because Jim was dying. I told her that I believed that I was supposed to be there, and she directed me to his bedroom.

Looking into that room revealed a panicked scene with Jim writhing on the bed fighting for air and his wife and daughter holding his hands. Jim was not on his foam wedge that he used to breathe better when he slept. He was too rigid.

At that moment, I had my biggest test as a chiropractor. I knew that he did not have the lung capacity for CPR, but I could not just stand there and watch. I said to myself, “You are a chiropractor, and you need to do what a chiropractor does.”

I analyzed what I needed to do and adjusted his axis. This produced immediate relaxation in him, and he calmed down. I was able to put the wedge under his back to help him breathe, then I did some lung reflex work on him as well.

Jim’s wife asked his daughter if she noticed anything different. His daughter replied that Jim’s hand was warming up. His wife said that was exactly what was happening to the hand she was holding.

After I did everything I could think of to help, I told Jim I would see him tomorrow night. He reminded me that I did not work on Tuesday afternoons. I smiled and told him that in this case I would be available. He thanked me for all I had done and for being his friend. We gave each other a hug, and then I went on home.

I found out from Jim’s family that Jim was able to get out of bed that evening. He then proceeded to talk with everyone there, saying what he had to say. Once he had done that, he laid back and calmly passed away. His family called to thank me for making such a bad situation better.

That night, I was shown what an adjustment can do—and that I had the courage to apply what I was taught. I am sure that my fellow chiropractors have their own stories like mine where they experienced the wonder of chiropractic. We have a wonderful gift in our ability to apply chiropractic for our patients, and we should how profound it can be.

Sincerely,

Geoff Mohn, D.C. (Davenport ’85)

 

My chiropractic miracle: One month to live

I grew up in the South Bay area of Los Angeles. I chose chiropractic as a life career because, once when I was very young and again when I was in high school, something happened to me that changed my life forever.

As an infant, I suffered with severe asthma. I was in and out of hospitals and medical offices, and was constantly on medication. I had to sleep in an inclined position, and someone had to stay up with me so that, when I couldn’t breath, they could turn on steam or rush me to the hospital.

At one point, at about the age of one, my parents were told that there was nothing more that anyone could do and that I had about one month to live. It was at this point that they decided to take me to a chiropractor. Dr. Charles Jones, a Palmer-trained chiropractor in Torrance, discovered that my top vertebra–the atlas–was jammed up against my skull from a birth trauma. This was causing interference with the delicate nerves that, among other things, control the lungs and entire respiratory system, causing them to dysfunction.

Dr. Jones gave me my first adjustment and, shortly afterwards, I began to cough up large amounts of phlegm and mucus. Within a week, and after a few more adjustments, I was breathing normally with no signs of asthma. I grew up with regular chiropractic care and enjoyed a very healthy, asthma-free life, thanks to chiropractic.

Now for the second part of the story. In high school, with no signs of any respiratory problems, I focused my life on competitive athletics. While playing football, I was injured and developed a serious condition known as a disc herniation. I had constant pain in my lower back and right leg. Over time, I couldn’t run and walking became difficult. After considering surgery (the only option, according to the surgeon), I again turned to chiropractic. It worked so well for me, and I was so impressed with the other miracles I saw in the doctor’s office, that I eventually went to chiropractic college myself. I now dedicate myself to helping others find the cause of their ailments and seek out natural, holistic solutions to health problems.

Donald J. Baune, D.C. (Davenport ’79)

How our office is celebrating Founder’s Day 2013

Happy birthday, Chiropractic!

Founder’s Day, on Sept. 18, 1895, is acknowledged as “birth date” of chiropractic. Chiropractors around the world recognize it in a number of ways. – Editor

At our office, we are celebrating chiropractic’s birthday by having a birthday party with a birthday cake with “Happy Birthday Chiropractic 128 years young and growing” on the icing.

We’re offering office visits at the same cost as when I first started practice in 1970. An office visit in Leon, Iowa, was $3.50 at that time. So on Wednesday, office visits will be $3.50 for everybody for the entire day. They office will be decorated with birthday banners and the story of how Chiropractic started will be relayed to the patients. Also the story of how I got started as a chiropractor will be shared. It ought to be a fun day.

Harvey J Feenstra, D.C.

Why I became a chiropractor

Dr. David Palmer

I was born in 1935 and grew up with a father who was a 1923 Palmer School of Chiropractic graduate. All my young life I received chiropractic care from Dad. My first experience with a medical doctor was when I ran a nail into my knee. Then at the ripe old age of 14, I learned what an aspirin was. I developed a bad toothache, and Dad went and bought a bottle of aspirin and made an ice pack to kill the pain until we could get to my uncle who was a dentist.

Over the years I observed the multitude of patients coming to the home office to see my father. After college, I took a teaching job in Cincinnati where my wife Marilyn and I settled. Then I went to the University of Cincinnati for a graduate degree. While working part time for the University, I was offered a full-time position and became the director of Financial Aid. I worked for the University from 1960 to 1965 and decided to visit the Palmer College of Chiropractic with my wife in the fall of l964. In the winter of l965, I decided to quit the rat race of college administration and the working 60 to 70 hours a week and become a Chiropractor. I enrolled in the spring of 1965.

However, as good luck could happen, Dr. Dave Palmer decided to open the Palmer Junior College at that time and asked me to work in the junior college. It was a late-afternoon and evening program and would work well with my studies at Palmer College of Chiropractic.

I will always thank Palmer and Dr. Dave for my education and for the many years since 1968 when I graduated. I try to be generous and in the l980s was instrumental in forming the Indiana Palmer College of Chiropractic International Alumni Association Endowed Scholarship Program, which today offers two $1,200 scholarships a year. Then, after seeing that off the ground and doing well, I have sponsored a scholarship for a student that is an Eagle Scout. To this day I continue contributing to this Eagle Scout fund.

God bless Chiropractic and God bless Palmer,

Ronald W. Woods, D.C., PCC ’68, son of Dr. Ralph Cook Woods, D.C., PSC ’23